The Fear of Missing Out as a Blogger

When I set out for vacation this spring break, immediately I thought about how much writing I was going to get done for my blog. With the peace and quiet that being away from work allows, I’ve always been able to get a lot of writing done when on vacation. Before I left I was already excited thinking about it, but things didn’t seem to go as planned this time around.

Upon arriving at the hotel, I realized I made a poor mistake. I forgot my laptop. All of my saved progress and pieces I was planning on completing were left 2,471 miles away in California, with no way to access my saved work or by blog. When my phone lost all connection, too, I grew paranoid thinking about what I was missing out on back home. I found myself trying to remain positive, yet the feeling of restlessness ate away at me.

“This should be a positive thing!” People told me when I confided in them about my worries. “Now you can take a break from writing and relax for a week!.”

I began to think, maybe taking a week off from writing would give me inspiration to write once returning home. They were absolutely right, too. I should be enjoying myself and taking advantage of it.

I contemplated that idea for a day before I realized that would not be so easy for me to just forget about writing, though. As grateful as I felt to simply be on vacation and appreciate the beauty around me, I could not take my mind away from what I felt like I was missing out on.

As soon as I was without my beloved laptop I drifted towards my natural tendencies as a creative writer. The more I couldn’t write, the more I grew paranoid that I would forget all of the ideas that I conjured up. So during my vacation, I quickly compiled pages upon pages worth of scattered notes on my phone. Ideas for my creative writing, quotes, and ideas for my blog. However I couldn’t write to the extent I wished to.

Quickly I felt the fear of missing out overwhelm me.

I have experienced “f.o.m.o.” on numerous social occasions, but never considered how it affected me as a writer. I came to think, writers may get the worst end of it.

We are constantly pressuring ourselves to create and create and create. Then create more as soon as we get the chance.

What more writers and artists of all mediums should remember is that you are still an artist, even in the moments you are not creating. We can all use breaks sometimes, even from what we love most. 

Returning home, the anxieties and fears melted away as soon as I realized that everything was fine.

Missing out on writing for a week didn’t kill me. In fact, I was able to get back to work without any problems. I was worried about something that frankly, didn’t matter in the long run. That is why it’s so important to tackle the fear of missing out on vacation so you can truly enjoy yourself.

What sounds like a minor inconvenience ended up affecting me much more than I thought it would. I never knew that “the fear of missing out’ would affect me as much as it did during vacation. It goes to show that sometimes we need that push to help us learn more about ourselves.

Without the opportunity to share work online I was given the opportunity to let go of the “working” side of blogging and focus entirely on art. Spending the days taking photos, enjoying the water and touring the island may be even better without worrying about blogging or social media the entire time. I also found that the writing I did through the notepad of my phone was more honest and vulnerable than work I may have written others.

This is something that all writers should practice whether on vacation or not. Sometimes we need to return to the basics and just write, without worrying how successful it will be on our blog.

Don’t let the fear of missing out as a blogger stop you from experiencing more.

XX

Thank you for reading. This post is intended to share my experience on vacation- not to criticize how others view it. If you’d like to share your ideas make sure to comment below and start a discussion!

Why You Should Open Up About Your Mental Health

four person standing at top of grassy mountain Photo by Helena Lopes on Pexels.com[/caption]

If you’re struggling with depression, anxiety, bi-polar or other mood disorders it’s important that you know one thing: it’s much more common than you think. I know how just scary it is to go through this thinking that you are alone, and especially how overwhelming it can become when you feel as though no one will quite understand. I’m here to tell you that there are people out there who understand, and opening up about it to a close friend or family member can be life changing in many ways. Here’s why.

Communication Is Key

Telling your loved one’s what you are going through is vital if you wish for people to understand you and the reasoning behind your actions.

As someone who has dealt with this first hand, I know what it is like to let anxieties damage relationships with family and friends. Many of us tend to isolate ourselves from those we care about, convincing ourselves that they don’t want to be around us before we give them a chance. When a close friend of mine sensed that something was up, I decided that I should open up about my own anxiety before I let it get in the way of an important friendship. I explained that I’ve always dealt with anxiety and that lately it had reached a high.

Doing this allowed them to understand that I wasn’t pushing them away because I didn’t care about them- that it was actually the opposite. They understood that they hadn’t done anything wrong. That sometimes I might feel distant.

Telling someone you know you can trust means they know when to reach out to you when you need it the most. They’ll understand that sometimes you want their support even when you deny it. They’ll also grow to know when you need your space and that you have limitations that they should not push.

Sometimes We Need To Let It All Out

woman looking at sunset
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Before I finally gathered the courage to tell a close friend what I had been going through I kept everything balled up inside. Every single anxiety inducing thought and worry was suppressed, leaving me feeling utterly hopeless. The longer I waited to tell someone the more built up. And for the longest time I had convinced myself that I shouldn’t trouble anyone with my worries. I thought that it wasn’t fair to burden others with my problems, that I could just push those negative thoughts and feelings and that it would be all right.

Keeping everything inside isn’t healthy, or will whatever you are dealing with will go away.

Something I learned from opening up about my problems is that talking about them might not fix it, but it may help bring some clarity  and release pent up feelings.

This is always up to you- some of us find it easier to resolve things on our own while others find comfort in seeking advice and sharing.

But what if they look at me differently?

I could lie and say that I am 100% comfortable discussing my experience with mental health and that writing this is easy. But I’m not going to because that is simply not the truth.

My biggest fear before telling those close to me was that they we treat me differently and see me as fragile or weak. Recently I discussed this with a close friend and I discovered something different. They told me that after I told them they were shocked that I was able to function so well. In fact, they said they felt proud knowing that I continued to put myself out there despite the fears holding me back. I was surprised by what my friends told me after I said this. They didn’t think that I was “weak” or “just paranoid” as I thought they would. They understood that my anxiety and depression didn’t define me. I was the same person I always had been- they just knew more about me.

What if you don’t feel ready, or you feel that your family/friends won’t be supportive?

In this situation the best thing you can do is encourage them to do a little research on mental illness- it is amazing how much someone’s perspective can change once they gain more knowledge on the topic. It’s absolutely okay if you want more time, just know that it’s never too late to reach out.

If all else fails and you still feel that they aren’t supportive, know that there is always someone out there who is. Don’t hesitate to reach out to a trusted adult or to the many resources you can find online.

Don’t let your anxiety or depression convince you that you are not worthy of love and support. If there is anything you take from this let it be that you are always worth it and your health should remain your priority. Don’t let anyone convince you otherwise. It’s up to you how you fight your battle and those who you wish to bring with you.

light sunset people water
Photo by Negative Space on Pexels.com

Why We Need to Travel

pexels-photo-287240.jpegWaking up every day, living the same life becomes exhausting. We become so accustomed to what we know that we seem to forget that so much more is out there in this world than what we are used too. We need to be reminded that there is so much more this world has to offer.

There are so many unique cultures out there. Being trapped in the same environment for so long limits our perspectives, closing us off to new ideas and values. Reading about different cultures from home is one thing, but experiencing them is another. Learning and experiencing different cultures from around the world gives us the chance to live life in someone else’s shoes. Doing this not only allows for us to build character, but teaches us to be more open minded. We begin to understand that there is beauty in the differences we share.